THE GOAT BARN

300 years of happiness meets modernity

We are proud of our latest addition, the ‘Goat Barn’, built on the site of the old goat barn on the farm. It is now home to our dining room, two lounges where you can relax with a book and enjoy the view, and two junior suites.

The ‘Goat Barn’ is a mixture of a traditional cog-jointed smokehouse from Norheimsund in the Hardanger region, dating from the early 18th century, and our own modern design. Since we like to reuse things, we are very proud of the ‘tower’ – built from recycled windows from houses and cabins that Bjørn has renovated over the years.

The stairs and the bathroom fittings are made from old timbers that were left over from the old ‘Smokehouse’.

Our junior suites, ‘Jericho’ and ‘Liverpool’, are the biggest rooms on the farm. They are perfect for couples on a romantic holiday who are looking to have a really romantic time together, or for families with children. Each room is equipped with an extra sofa bed.

Amenities

  • 2 Suites
  • All bathrooms have rain showers
  • 3 Lounges
  • Outside hot tub
  • Sauna
  • Wi-fi

Availability

Got a question? Don’t hesitate to contact us.
+47 900 26 156  | post@292aurland.com


THE SUITES

The Liverpool Suite

The Jericho Suite

RØYKSTOVA

Breakfast Lounge

Our complimentary breakfast is served every morning in Røykstova breakfast lounge. We endeavour to serve locally produced, organic food, such as goat cheese, goat salami, artisanal bread, eggs from our neighbours, freshly pressed apple and raspberry juice and greens from our own garden.

The two wood-burning stoves in the Goat Barn are very popular, both at mealtimes and to create a cosy atmosphere. So come and get ‘cosy’! Is there anything more Norwegian than that? It must be because we are good at enjoying ourselves, after all.

smokehouse

— a type of house where the smoke from the fireplace goes straight into the room and escapes through an opening, or vent, in the ceiling.

Before ‘smoke stoves’ and chimneys became commonplace, houses with open hearths were the norm in Norway and were usually only called a ‘stove’ or house. The smoke vent also let in light – through the ceiling.